Lasik Eye Surgery Price

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By Liz SegrePage updated October 26, 2017 Like This Page? Please Share! On this page: Average LASIK eye surgery prices • "Bargain" prices for LASIK • How to make LASIK more affordable See also: How to compare laser eye surgery prices Confused about the cost of LASIK? It's understandable. After all, if you want to buy a mobile phone or a dining room table or an automobile, all you have to do is go online and do a search to compare prices.

With elective surgeries such as LASIK, solid price information is hard to find online, and the cost of LASIK eye surgery can vary quite a bit from one provider to another. Prices depend on what technology the surgeon uses, how much vision correction you need, how difficult your procedure is and more. We explain these factors in our article, "How to Compare Laser Eye Surgery Costs." Here are average prices for LASIK and other excimer laser vision correction procedures (PRK, Epi-LASIK, LASEK) performed in the United States in the first six months of 2017, based on a survey of refractive surgeons conducted by a leading vision care industry analyst.

Average LASIK Eye Surgery Costs Keep in mind that these prices are for LASIK or other laser vision correction performed on one eye only. To estimate your cost of LASIK on both eyes, you need to double the price quoted. Also, if you choose bladeless LASIK, where the corneal flap is created with a femtosecond laser instead of a microkeratome, expect to pay at least a couple hundred dollars more (per eye) than the average prices quoted here.

The same is true if you choose custom LASIK that employs wavefront technology for the most precise vision correction possible. In the first half of 2017, the average price for LASIK and other types of excimer laser vision correction surgery was $2,135 per eye. This is slightly higher than the average price in 2016, which was $2,059 per eye. Pricing Methods More than 3 out of 4 refractive surgeons (78.

2 percent) said they quote a single price for LASIK and other excimer laser procedures for all patients. The other surgeons (21.8 percent) quote different prices for different procedures, depending on the technology used and/or the amount of refractive error and vision correction required. Recommended For You Charging a single price means newer technologies such as customized wavefront procedures and laser-created flaps are not priced separately as "extras" that are charged in addition to a basic fee for a laser vision correction procedure.

Are Bargain Prices Available For LASIK? It's not unusual to see advertisements promising LASIK for less than $1,000 per eye, which may sound like a great bargain. But it's likely that: The "bargain" LASIK price is only for the correction of mild nearsightedness. If you have farsightedness, astigmatism, or moderate to high amounts of nearsightedness, the cost of LASIK may be significantly higher than the advertised price.

The offer price doesn't cover all fees. For instance, you may have only a limited number of follow-up visits, and if there's a problem, additional post-op care could cost extra. Also, the cost of enhancement/retreatment surgeries probably are not included, and you may even be charged extra for your initial consultation. Your procedure may be performed with older technology. This isn't necessarily bad, but newer technologies do offer the possibility of a more precise LASIK procedure, with less risk of complications.

For example, for $499 you likely won't receive custom LASIK or bladeless (all-laser) LASIK. If you're considering LASIK for an unusually low cost, make sure you get a written quote that itemizes everything in the offer. Read the fine print, and ask about all potential extra fees before going ahead with the procedure. How To Make LASIK Surgery More Affordable There are a number of ways to make the cost of LASIK more affordable.

Many eye care practices offer special pricing for LASIK and other vision surgeries. Examples of special pricing include zero-interest financing, limited-time offers and special group pricing. There also are financial companies that specialize in elective surgical procedures like LASIK and offer plans with fixed rates and long-term payments. Most LASIK surgery centers and private medical practices offer financing plans administered by these companies to their patients.

According to Market Scope, slightly more than half (50.9 percent) of the refractive surgeons they surveyed in early 2017 offered some sort of special LASIK pricing, primarily no-interest financing. Most vision insurance plans don't cover refractive surgery because they consider it cosmetic and therefore medically unnecessary. However, some employers make arrangements with a given LASIK center (or refractive surgery center) for a special price.

Note that some large employers offer subsidized health plans that cover at least part of LASIK costs. If you work for a major company, ask about possible benefits that might cover elective corrective eye surgery procedures. Also, Flexible Spending Accounts (FSAs) are often used to pay for laser eye surgery. This is where you can divert pre-tax salary into an account for out-of-pocket health care, if your employer offers it.

In 2017, the maximum employee contribution to an FSA is $2,600. So it's likely you still will have to pay a portion of your LASIK surgery by other means if you use an FSA to help pay for your procedure. Another option is to set tax-free money aside in a Health Savings Account (HSA) to pay for LASIK surgery. To be eligible for an HSA, you must be covered by a high-deductible health plan (HDHP) at work.

You can add tax-free contributions to your HSA each pay period, up to an annual limit of $3,400 for individual coverage and $6,750 for family coverage (2017 limits; includes employee and employer contributions). And, unlike an FSA, any unspent money in your HSA at the end of the year "rolls over" so you can use it the following year or sometime further in the future. So, depending on your budget, you could save enough money to pay the entire cost of your LASIK surgery by contributing money to your HSA over a period of two or more years.

If you're in the U.S. military, LASIK and other corrective vision surgery options may be available to you free of charge. Your eligibility would depend at least partly on the nature of your duties. A final note: You may be tempted to choose a surgeon based only on the fee charged, but that may be unwise. It's better to choose the best surgeon you can find and then, if you need it, get the most affordable financing you can.

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  Average: $1,950 per eye High: $2,500 per eye   Typical costs: The cost of laser eye surgery, known as LASIK, varies widely from surgeon to surgeon, with a national average of about $1,950 per eye. Average prices do not vary much by geographic region, but minimum and maximum fees do. All About Vision[1] provides a chart of regional cost differences. The cost of laser eye surgery also depends on whether your surgeon is performing traditional LASIK or the more expensive Custom LASIK, in which the doctor uses new technology to create a three-dimensional map of the patient's eye.

This allows for a more precise vision correction and possibly lower chances of post-surgery complications. Most surgeons charge between $200 to $500 extra per eye for this. Also, if your surgeon uses IntraLase, another new technology, you can expect to pay an average of $344 more per eye. In IntraLase, the surgeon uses a laser, instead of a small metal blade, to cut a flap in the cornea where a laser is then used to reshape the cornea.

Surgeons who use it say it provides a lower risk of complications and a better chance of achieving 20/20 vision. Related articles: Eyelid Surgery What should be included: The International Society of Refractive Surgery gives a diagram, and an overview of the LASIK procedure, which takes about 30 minutes. Additional costs: Your surgeon should offer a series of follow-up visits as part of the total cost of the procedure.

But, if something goes wrong and you need more visits or additional surgery not spelled out in your agreement, you will have to pay for it out-of-pocket. Discounts: Many health insurance providers consider laser eye surgery a cosmetic procedure and do not cover the cost. But patients who pay for eye surgery out-of-pocket might be eligible for a tax deduction. Tip: Check to see whether your employer has negotiated a corporate discount with a certain provider on LASIK surgery for employees.

If they have not, check with human resources to see if they would be willing to consider the possibility. Sometimes it is possible to get 10 to 25 percent off this way. Shopping for lasik eye surgery: Tip: Beware of advertisements that offer LASIK surgery at prices that seem too good to be true. Some LASIK providers have paid fines, after actions by state attorneys general, for false advertising of bargain-priced laser surgery that turned out to have hidden fees.

When shopping for LASIK, always make sure that the quoted price includes regular follow-up visits and any medically necessary follow-up surgery needed in the first year. SeeWithLasik.com[2] offers a guide for consumers on evaluating LASIK prices. Tip: Be aware that LASIK is not right for everyone - poor candidates include patients whose glasses or contact prescription fluctuates due to pregnancy or disease such as diabetes; athletes who regularly participate in contact sports; and patients with conditions such as lupus or rheumatoid arthritis, that may interfere with healing.

Material on this page is for informational purposes only and should not be construed as medical advice. Always consult your physician or pharmacist regarding medications or medical procedures.  CostHelper News What People Are Paying - Recent Comments External Resources:  www.allaboutvision.com/visionsurgery/cost.htm#reg  www.seewithlasik.com/docs/lasik-costs.html More Health & Personal Care Topics Search Thousands of Topics on CostHelper.

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