Oregon Wholesale Christmas Tree Prices

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About Us Growing in the foothills of the Cascade mountains of Oregon, Holiday Specialtrees ships throughout the United States and overseas.Learn more Our Trees We currently farm about 2,220 acres, specializing in Noble Fir, Douglas-fir and Nordmann fir Christmas trees.Learn more Find Us Visit our operation to see for yourself the service and quality we provide to our clients.Learn more "We harvest our trees to attain the highest possible quality and freshness to assure that our customers receive their trees in the best condition.

" Jim Schaefer

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Photo: Nathaniel Y. Downes, The Chronicle Image 1of/17 Caption Close Image 1 of 17 A Christmas tree shortage could mean higher prices at tree lots this winter, according to the National Christmas Tree Association. A Christmas tree shortage could mean higher prices at tree lots this winter, according to the National Christmas Tree Association. Photo: Nathaniel Y.

Downes, The Chronicle Image 2 of 17 A woman measures the height of a tree using a saw at the Norquist Tree Farm in the Santa Cruz Mountains. A woman measures the height of a tree using a saw at the Norquist Tree Farm in the Santa Cruz Mountains. Photo: Bill Disbrow/SFGATE Image 3 of 17 Trees are offered for sale at a lot in San Anselmo, California. Trees are offered for sale at a lot in San Anselmo, California.

Photo: Bill Disbrow/SFGATE Image 4 of 17 $60 trees advertised at a tree farm on Black Rd. in the Santa Cruz mountains. $60 trees advertised at a tree farm on Black Rd. in the Santa Cruz mountains. Photo: Bill Disbrow/SFGATE Image 5 of 17 Image 6 of 17 Photo: Christian Abraham / Hearst Connecticut Media Image 7 of 17 37 percent of Americans said they spent more than $500 on holiday shopping in 2016.

Source: WalletHub 37 percent of Americans said they spent more than $500 on holiday shopping in 2016.Source: WalletHub Photo: Christian Abraham, Hearst Connecticut Media Image 8 of 17 33 percent of Americans plan to spend more than $500 on holiday shopping in 2017.Source: WalletHub 33 percent of Americans plan to spend more than $500 on holiday shopping in 2017.Source: WalletHub Photo: Matthew Brown, For Hearst Connecticut Media Image 9 of 17 Five in 10 people say they are better off financially this year than last year.

Source: WalletHub Five in 10 people say they are better off financially this year than last year.Source: WalletHub Photo: Brian A. Pounds, Hearst Connecticut Media Image 10 of 17 Image 11 of 17 53 percent of Americans don't think Black Friday sales are anything special.Source: WalletHub 53 percent of Americans don't think Black Friday sales are anything special.Source: WalletHub Photo: Christian Abraham /Connecticut Post Image 12 of 17 One in seven Americans will still be in holiday debt by Valentine's Day.

Source: WalletHub One in seven Americans will still be in holiday debt by Valentine's Day.Source: WalletHub Photo: Christian Abraham Image 13 of 17 41 percent of people want gift cards. (15 percent: clothes, 15 percent: electronics, 10 percent: books, 9 percent: furniture, 5 percent: toys, 5 percent: jewelry)Source: WalletHub 41 percent of people want gift cards. (15 percent: clothes, 15 percent: electronics, 10 percent: books, 9 percent: furniture, 5 percent: toys, 5 percent: jewelry)Source: WalletHub Photo: Shutterstock Image 14 of 17 77 percent of Americans plan to make a charitable donation this year.

Source: WalletHub 77 percent of Americans plan to make a charitable donation this year.Source: WalletHub Photo: Catherine Avalone — New Haven Register FILE PHOTO Image 15 of 17 Image 16 of 17 74 percent of Americans said they made a charitable donation in 2016.Source: WalletHub 74 percent of Americans said they made a charitable donation in 2016.Source: WalletHub Photo: Gary Krambeck Image 17 of 17 A Christmas tree shortage is driving higher prices at lots this year Back to Gallery The Christmas season is officially upon us, and with it comes the tradition of purchasing a fresh-cut tree to bring home for the holiday.

Those who have already done their tree shopping may have experienced sticker shock when picking up their tree at the local lot, however: The country is in the midst of what tree growers are calling a shortage with prices increasing at many places. The recession is largely being blamed as the reason we're experiencing higher prices at lots. Christmas trees take about 10 years to grow for retail, according to National Christmas Tree Association spokesman Doug Hundley, which is why consumers are mostly seeing the slowdown in selection and the increase in prices now.

"In 2007, we were at the beginning of our recession and tree sales were down, prices were down, farmers didn't have the space in their fields to replant because they weren't harvesting as many," Hundley said. "There was a slowdown in planting 10 years ago, and that's what's leading to this: it's not the fires, it's not the weather, it's just the planting rhythm of this crop is very long and we can't grow them fast.

" And while that may be true, some family tree farmers in the Santa Cruz Mountains say the California drought did prevent many new plantings from taking root and surviving, potentially further limiting the local supply. Ken Orsow, manager and former owner of Christmas Tree Jamboree in the Bayview district of San Francisco, noticed the increase in prices. Orsow noted that prices jumped "dramatically" in the last three years, saying he's looking at $5 to $10 more per tree than last Christmas.

"This is the most expensive I've seen the trees hit in my lifetime," Orsow said. "Some of the trees are costing as much as $70 just for the wholesale of the tree. That's a lot of money." Orsow's worked with Christmas trees for about 50 years by his estimate, and he's guessing that there may be another year of raised pricing before the market slows down. "It's a commodity: Prices go way up, (then) it goes way down," Orsow said of the trees.

"I've always tried to stay even on the pricing, but when it goes up this far, there's no way that you can not raise the price of your trees. You have to at least match what you've been raised. "This is a community lot for the people down in the Bayview and Hunter's Point area, and I've always tried to keep the prices way, way down," he added. "If I go up $5 or $7 wholesale, that's what they go up on my retail.

" The majority of Christmas trees are grown in North Carolina and Oregon, and this is the first time in years that both states are in short supply, according to Hundley. Oregon largely supplies the West Coast with its trees and its shortage will largely affect California pricing. Noble firs in Oregon are particularly experiencing growing issues, beyond the pullback from growers over the recession.

Willamette Valley experienced a "practically nonexistent" crop of Nobles for about 15 years, before finally reaping a good crop in 2016. That tree species is expected to continue commanding a much higher pricing. "There is a shortage of Noble trees grown in the Northwest and it is expected to last eight years or more, so prices for Nobles will definitely rise probably from 5 to 10 percent this year," according to Sam Minturn executive director of the California Christmas Tree Association.

The national group is predicting a 5 to 10 percent increase across the country for all trees, saying higher prices are also expected to happen with East Coast tree lots purchasing from North Carolina suppliers as well, according to Hundley. The hope is that the market will return to normal before 2020. "It'll take some patience, the Christmas tree growers since 2010 have been planting heavily, and we think this undersupply or tight market will pass in just a couple more years," Hundley said.

One suggestion to avoid a limited selection of trees is to head to local farms that allow customers to choose and cut down their own tree. Places such as the Little Hills Christmas Tree Farm in Petaluma grow their own trees and reported that they're not experiencing the shortages and raised prices that lots featuring trees from commercial growers are seeing. "This is a good time to visit a local tree farm as they nearly all grow more than one species of tree," Minturn said.

 "We haven't heard of any shortages with them unless they were affected by the forest fires such as the one in the Santa Rosa area." Now, the shortage doesn't mean that Christmas tree lots are empty of trees, but it will become difficult for procrastinators to pick up a last-minute tree. Retailers and experts are suggesting customers pick up their trees earlier this year in order to avoid slim pickings later in December.

The Associated Press contributed to this report.

Hazel Gordon

Saving cash may be the main concern for anyone or retail business, and the easiest method to accomplish this is to find marketing at low cost.